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Towards an Understanding of Professional Dispositions of Exemplary School Librarians

  • Jami L. JonesEmail author
  • Gail Bush
Chapter
Part of the Educational Media and Technology Yearbook book series (EMTY, volume 36)

Abstract

A review of literature reveals the ongoing struggle by educators to understand the concept of professional dispositions. The inclusion of dispositions in action in the American Association of School Librarians’ Standards for the 21st-century Learner (2007) motivates school library professionals to join their educational colleagues in efforts to comprehend the concept of dispositions and the behaviors leading to increased student learning. In this chapter, the authors seek to answer the significant questions regarding the conceptual and philosophical meaning of dispositions, as well as their acquisition and assessment by focusing on the historical perspective surrounding this concept. The authors urge readers to take a thoughtful and reflective stance towards this complex concept rather than viewing dispositions simply as means to an assessment checklist. Meaningful conversations about dispositions prompt increased educational achievement because effectiveness derives from dispositions (Knopp, T. Y., & Smith, R. L. (2005). A brief historical context for dispositions in teacher education. In R. L. Smith, D. Skarbek, & J. Hurst (Eds.), The passion of teaching: Dispositions in the schools (pp. 1–15). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Library ScienceEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Reading and LanguageNational-Louis UniversitySkokieUSA

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