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ACCESS Issues in School Library Media Centers: Examining Library Schedules, Library Closures, and Poverty

  • Karen GaviganEmail author
  • Gail Dickinson
  • Shana Pribesh
Chapter
Part of the Educational Media and Technology Yearbook book series (EMTY, volume 36)

Abstract

A hallmark of best practice in school libraries is for students and faculty to have maximum access to library resources and services. However, findings from a recent quantitative study indicate that this is not always the case. The researchers surveyed school librarians in North Carolina and Virginia to determine the effects that scheduling, library closures, and poverty had on access to school libraries. There were three major findings from the study. First, the results revealed a direct relationship between flexible scheduling and an increase in per-pupil book circulation in elementary schools. Next, the findings showed that school libraries were closed, while students were in session, an average of 17 full days in an academic year. Finally, the study demonstrated that K-12 school libraries serving large proportions of children living in poverty were open fewer days and had fewer resources than schools that served small proportions of students living in poverty.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Library and Information ScienceUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Darden College of EducationOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA

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