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In the District and on the Desktop: School Libraries as Essential Elements of Effective Broadband Use in Schools

  • Nancy EverhartEmail author
  • Marcia Mardis
Chapter
Part of the Educational Media and Technology Yearbook book series (EMTY, volume 36)

Abstract

Demands for the Internet in administrative, instructional, and learning tasks in schools are rising. Because adequate bandwidth in schools supports the home-school learning continuum, links to civic and governmental organizations, and situations in which home connectivity is scarce, reconsiderations in investments in connectivity supply and support are due. Yet, many school administrators report concerns about their bandwidth and employ strategies to level access among their teachers and students. Limited access in schools and classrooms results in stifled instructional creativity and few opportunities for students to gain twenty-first-century skills needed later academic and workplace success. Even when connectivity is adequate, educators and learners require support to make the most of the Internet. School librarians, on-site technology leaders with expertise in supporting digitally immersive learning, have great potential to help administrators, teachers, and students make the best use of the connectivity.

Keywords

Internet Access School Administrator English Language Learner Broadband Access School Librarian 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Many thanks Dr. Charles McClure, Lauren Mandel, Melissa Johnston and Daniella Smith for their contributions to this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Partnerships for Advancing Library Media (PALM) Center, School of Library and Information Studies, College of Communication & InformationThe Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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