Power Package Electrical Isolation Design

  • Yong Liu
Chapter

Abstract

Power Electronics packaging consists of power semiconductor devices, power integrated circuits, sensors, and protection circuits for a wide range of power electronics applications (Trends in analog and power packaging, 2009; Challenges of power electronic packaging and modeling, 2011; Mixed-signal and power-integration packaging solutions, 2010), such as inverters for motor drives and converters for power processing equipment. Integration in power electronics is a rather complex process due to incompatibility of materials and processing methods used in fabrication, and due to the high electrical density levels and electrical isolation requirements these components must handle. Packaging involves the solution of electrical, mechanical, and thermal problems. Electrical isolation is one of the important factors to be considered in the power packaging design, as it relates directly to the product reliability and safety. Based on the standard of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the US Standard (UL), such as the standard IEC60950-1 (Information technology equipment-safety, part 1: general requirements, 2005) and UL60950-1 (Information technology equipment-safety, part 1: general requirements, 2007), designers shall take into account not only the normal operating conditions of the equipment but also likely fault conditions, consequential faults, foreseeable misuse, and external influences such as temperature, altitude, pollution, moisture, overvoltages in a system that use the power packaging products. This chapter discusses the power package electrical isolation design considerations.

Keywords

Dust Mold Epoxy Polyimide Flammability 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The author thanks the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for permission to reproduce information from its International Standard IEC 61950-1 ed.2.0 (2005). All such extracts are copyright of IEC, Geneva, Switzerland. All rights reserved. Further information on the IEC is available from www.iec.ch. IEC has no responsibility for the placement and context in which the extracts and contents are reproduced by the author, nor is IEC in any way responsible for the other content or accuracy therein.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Fairchild Semiconductor CorporationSouth PortlandUSA

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