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Star Maps pp 225-314 | Cite as

Special topics

  • Nick Kanas
Chapter
Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

In this chapter we will discuss a number of special topics of relevance to celestial maps and prints. Some of these topics relate to objects that have been used in observing and mapping the heavens, such as celestial globes and gores, volvelles, and early astronomical instruments and telescopes. Other topics pertain to non-stellar bodies in the heavens that are mapped in antiquarian prints, such as the components of our solar system and deep-sky objects. Finally, we will discuss frontispieces and title pages.

Keywords

Special Topic Lunar Surface Solar Eclipse Title Page Page Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nick Kanas
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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