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Assessment in Juvenile Justice Systems: An Overview

  • Robert D. Hoge
Chapter

Abstract

The assessment process involves the collection, processing, and synthesis of information about the individual. The outcome of the assessment is generally expressed as a judgment or opinion which may, in turn, be expressed as a categorization (e.g., bipolar depression, autistic, high risk for violent offending) or as a position on a quantitative scale (e.g., 76 percentile on measure of spatial ability, 80% likelihood of reoffending). Formal and informal assessments are conducted in juvenile justice systems by police, prosecuting attorneys, probation officers, mental health professionals, and others, and these assessments are used as the basis for important decisions about the youth.

Keywords

Mental Health Professional Assessment Instrument Standardize Assessment Personality Test Juvenile Justice System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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