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Development Anatomy and Its Impact on Hip Function

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Hip Joint Restoration

Abstract

Successful development and maturation of the hip involves ongoing integration of various congenital, environmental and morphological stimuli over a period of time. The development of the proximal femur and acetabulum are interdependent and changes in either component affect the development of the other and abnormal morphology of the hip can predispose the joint to particular patterns of injury and development of osteoarthritic changes. Some of the anatomical shapes seen in the young adults with mechanical problems of the hip might be related to the evolutionary demand of upright posture and running. The ossification process within the proximal femur and the acetabulum is complex and susceptible to various insults depending upon the stage of development. The identification of various aetiological factors associated with abnormal hip development is important as some can be modified. There is strong evidence suggesting the role of certain physical activities during skeletal maturation may influence the growth and development of the hip joint.

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Correspondence to Paul E. Beaulé MD, FRCSC .

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Singh, A., Beaulé, P.E. (2017). Development Anatomy and Its Impact on Hip Function. In: McCarthy, J., Noble, P., Villar, R. (eds) Hip Joint Restoration. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0694-5_99

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0694-5_99

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