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Children with Disabilities and Supportive School Ecologies

  • Neerja Sharma
  • Rekha Sharma Sen
Chapter

Abstract

When one asks children whether they want to go to school, the answer is invariably a loud “yes,” because school is a meaningful context that gives them a sense of well-being and identity (Beteille, 2005; Nsamenang, 2003). However, in India, schooling for children with disabilities is rare. In most societies children with disabilities are a silent minority. Their rights are only defended when public-spirited members of the civil society speak.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Special School Inclusive Education Inclusive School Inclusive Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin CollegeUniversity of DelhiNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Faculty of Child Development, School of Continuing EducationIndira Gandhi National Open UniversityNew DelhiIndia

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