More Than a Nice Thing to Do: A Practice-Based Evidence Approach to Outcome Evaluation in Native Youth and Family Programs

  • Barbara J. Friesen
  • Terry L. Cross
  • Pauline R. Jivanjee
  • L. Kris Gowen
  • Abby Bandurraga
  • Sara Bastomski
  • Cori Matthew
  • Nichole June Maher
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes the activities and results of a practice-based evidence project designed to develop a framework for culturally responsive effectiveness evaluation within a community agency serving urban American Indian and Alaska Native youth and families. This response to the demand for “evidence-based practice” includes a community-based participatory research approach to identifying youth outcomes valued by the community, the development of a self-assessment tool that reflects community-defined outcomes, and an effort to develop effectiveness evaluation that is both culturally appropriate and seen as credible by mainstream researchers and policy-makers.

Keywords

Depression Assure Espiritu 

References

  1. American Indian Law Center. (1999). Model tribal research code (3rd ed.). Albuquerque: American Indian Law Center.Google Scholar
  2. Barkham, M., & Mellor-Clark, J. (2003). Bridging evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence: Developing a rigorous and relevant knowledge for the psychological therapies. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 10, 319–327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bigfoot, D. S., & Braden, J. (2007). Adapting evidence-based treatments for use with American Indian and Native Alaskan children and youth. Focal Point, 1(21), 19–22.Google Scholar
  4. Brannan, A. M. (2003). Ensuring effective mental health treatment in real-world settings and the critical role of families. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 12(1), 1–10.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brener, N. D., Billy, J. O. G., & Grady, W. R. (2003). Assessment of factors affecting the validity of self-reported health-risk behavior among adolescents: Evidence from the scientific literature. Journal of Adolescent Health, 33, 436–457.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2007). Youth risk behavior survey. www.cdc.gov/yrbss Accessed 4 June 2007.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). Suicide: facts at a glance. http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/Suicide-DataSheet-a.pdf. Accessed 19 August 2010.
  8. Crooks, C. V., Chiodo, D., Thomas, D., & Hughes, R. (2010). Strengths-based programming for First Nations youth in schools: Building engagement through healthy relationships and leadership skills. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 8, 160–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cross, T. L. (1995). Understanding family resiliency from a relational view. In H. I. McCubbin, E. A. Thompson, A. I. Thompson, & J. E. Fromer (Eds.), Resiliency in ethnic minority families: Vol. I. Native and immigrant American families. Madison: University of Wisconsin.Google Scholar
  10. Cross, T. L. (2003). Culture as a resource for mental health. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 9(4), 354–359.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Cross, T. L., Friesen, B. J., & Maher, N. (2007). Successful strategies for improving the lives of American Indian and Alaska Native youth and families. Focal point: Research, policy & practice in children’s mental health, 21(7), 10–13.Google Scholar
  12. Cross, T., Friesen, B. J., Jivanjee, P., Gowen, L. K., Bandurraga, A., Mathew, C., & Maher, N. (2011). Defining youth success using culturally appropriate community-based participatory research methods Best Practices in Mental Health, 7(1), 94–114.Google Scholar
  13. Davis, J. D., & Keemer, K. (2002). A brief history and future considerations for research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. In J. D. Davis, J. S. Erickson, S. R. Johnson, C. A. Marshall, P. Running Wolf, & R. Santiago (Eds.), Workgroup on American Indian research and program evaluation methodology (AIRPEM), Symposium on research and evaluation methodology: Lifespan issues related to American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (pp. 9–18). Flagstaff: Northern Arizona University, Institute for Human Development, Arizona University Center on Disabilities, American Indian Rehabilitation Research and Training Center.Google Scholar
  14. Espiritu, R. C. (2003). What about promotoras, shamans, and Kru Khmers? Data Matters, 6(Spring/Summer), 19–20.Google Scholar
  15. Evans, C., Connell, J., Barkham, M., Marshall, C., & Mellor-Clark, J. (2003). Practice-based evidence: Benchmarking NHS primary care counseling services at national and local levels. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 10, 374–388.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Fisher, P. A., & Ball, T. J. (2005). Balancing empiricism and local cultural knowledge in the design of prevention research. Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 82(2), iii44–iii55.Google Scholar
  17. Fox, K., Becker-Green, J., Gault, J., & Simmons, D. (2005). Native American youth in transition: The path from adolescence to adulthood in two Native American communities. Portland: National Indian Child Welfare Association. http://www.hewlett.org/download?guid=5fad634f-49c4-102c-ab7e. Accessed 19 August 2010.
  18. Friesen, B. J., Gowen, L. K., Lo, P., Bandurraga, A., Cross, T. L., & Matthew, C. (2010). Literature support for outcomes in evaluating culturally- and community-based programs. Indicators of success for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youth: An agency example. Portland: Practice-Based Evidence Project, Research & Training Center on Family Support & Children’s Mental Health, Portland State University.Google Scholar
  19. Gone, J. P. (2004). Mental health services for Native Americans in the 21st century United States. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 35(1), 10–18.Google Scholar
  20. Gone, J. P., & Alcántara, C. (2007). Identifying effective mental health interventions for American Indians and Alaska Natives: A review of the literature. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 13(4), 356–363.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hoagwood, K., Burns, B. J., & Weisz, J. R. (2002). A profitable conjunction: From science to service in children’s mental health. In B. J. Burns & K. Hoagwood (Eds.), Community treatment for youth: Evidence-based interventions for severe emotional and behavioral disorders (pp. 327–338). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Holmes, D., Murray, S. J., Perron, A., & Rail, G. (2006). Deconstructing the evidence-based discourse in health sciences: Truth, power, and fascism. International Journal of Evidence Based Health, 4, 180–186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. International Resilience Project. (n.d.). The Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM)-28: User Manual.Google Scholar
  24. Kurtines, W. M., Ferrer-Wreder, L., Berman, S. L., Lorente, C. C., Silverman, W. K., & Montgomery, M. J. (2008). Promoting positive youth development: New directions in development theory, methods, and research. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 233–244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Manson, S., Mitchell, C., Fleming, C., Baron, A., Keane, E., Shangreaux, D., & Martin, R. (n.d.). Voices of Indian Teens Project: Scales documentation. Unpublished manuscript. National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. http://aianp.uchsc.edu/ncaianmhr/research/pdf_files/vcscales.pdf Accessed 20 November 2007.
  26. McDonald, J. D. (2002). A model for conducting research with American Indian participants. In J. D. Davis, J. S. Erickson, S. R. Johnson, C. A. Marshall, P. Running Wolf, R. Santiago, et al. (Eds.), Workgroup on American Indian research and program evaluation methodology (AIRPEM), Symposium on research and evaluation methodology: Lifespan issues related to American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (Appendix D, pp. 176–178). Flagstaff: Northern Arizona University, Institute for Human Development, Arizona University Center on Disabilities, American Indian Rehabilitation Research and Training Center. (Reprinted with permission of the author.)Google Scholar
  27. Oregon Department of Human Services. (2007). Center for health statistics. Oregon Healthy Teens–Youth Surveys, Salem, Oregon. http://www.dhs.state.or.us/dhs/ph/chs/youthsurvey/ohteens/2007/oht8th2007.pdf Accessed 26 April 2007.
  28. Oregon Senate Bill 267. (2003). http://pub.das.state.or.us/LEG_BILLS/PDFs/ESB267.pdf. Accessed 5 May 2009.
  29. Radloff, L. S. (1977). The CES-D scale: A self-report depression scale for research in the general population. Applied Psychological Measurement, 1, 385–401.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Scheyett, A. (2006). Silence and surveillance: Mental illness, evidence-based practice, and a Foucaultian lens. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 17(1), 71–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Singh, N. N., & Oswald, D. P. (2004). Evidence-based practice. Part I: General methodology. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 13(20), 129–142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Snyder, C. R., Hoza, B., Pelham, W., Rapoff, M., Ware, L., Danovsky, M., & Stahl, K. J. (1997). The development and validation of the Children’s Hope Scale. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 22(3), 399–421.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Urban Indian Health Institute. (2009). Urban Native American and Alaska Native youth: An analysis of select national data sources. Seattle: Seattle Indian Health Board.Google Scholar
  34. Ungar, M., Liebenberg, L., Boothroyd, R., Kwong, W. M., Lee, T. Y., Leblanc, J., Duque, L., & Makhnach, A. (2008). The study of youth resilience across cultures: Lessons from a pilot study of measurement development. Research in Human Development, 5(3), 166–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Weaver, H. N. (1997). The challenges of research in Native American communities. Journal of Social Service Research, 23(2), 1–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara J. Friesen
    • 1
  • Terry L. Cross
    • 5
  • Pauline R. Jivanjee
    • 2
  • L. Kris Gowen
    • 3
  • Abby Bandurraga
    • 4
  • Sara Bastomski
    • 6
  • Cori Matthew
    • 6
  • Nichole June Maher
    • 6
  1. 1.Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children’s Mental Health, Regional Research InstitutePortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
  2. 2.School of Social WorkPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
  3. 3.Regional Research Institute, School of Social WorkPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
  4. 4.Regional Research InstitutePortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
  5. 5.National Indian Child Welfare AssociationPortlandUSA
  6. 6.Native American Youth and Family CenterPortlandUSA

Personalised recommendations