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Cross-Contamination Avoidance for Droplet Routing

  • Yang Zhao
  • Krishnendu Chakrabarty
Chapter

Abstract

The avoidance of cross-contamination during droplet routing is a key design challenge for biochips. A droplet-routing method has been proposed to avoid cross-contamination in the optimization of droplet flow paths. The proposed approach targets disjoint droplet routes and synchronizes wash-droplet routing with functional droplet routing, in order to reduce the duration of droplet routing while avoid the cross-contamination between different droplet routes. In order to avoid cross-contamination between successive routing steps, an optimization technique is used to minimize the number of wash operations that must be used between successive routing steps.

Keywords

Clock Cycle Fluidic Constraint Wash Step Arrival Order Waste Reservoir 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Advanced Micro DevicesNashuaUSA
  2. 2.Duke University ECEDurhamUSA

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