Measurement of Oil in Produced Water

Chapter

Abstract

The measurement of oil in produced water is important for both process control and reporting to regulatory authorities. The concentration of oil in produced water is a method-dependent parameter, which is traditionally evaluated using reference methods based on infrared (IR) absorption or gravimetric analysis, although Gas Chromatography and Flame Ionisation Detection (GC-FID) have recently become more accepted. This chapter will give a brief overview of hydrocarbon chemistry and discuss the definition of oil in produced water and the requirement for its measurement. Reference and non-reference (bench-top and online monitoring) methods for the measurement of oil in produced water are reviewed. Issues related to sampling, sample handling and calibration, as well as methods of how to accept a non-reference method for the purpose of reporting, are discussed.

Keywords

Hexane Ozone Diesel Stratification Alkane 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The author thanks TUV NEL (http://www.tuvnel.com) for permitting the publication of this chapter. TUV NEL is a leading provider of pipeline fluid management services to the global petroleum industry. It offers consulting, training, R&D and laboratory testing services in subject areas that include flow, environment, and measurement.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.TUV NEL Ltd, Scottish Enterprise Technology ParkEast Kilbride, GlasgowUK

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