Amino Acid Nutrition of the Chick

  • David H. Baker
Part of the Advances in Nutritional Research book series (volume 1)

Abstract

The earliest records of chick studies with crystalline amino acid diets involved work by Grau and Almquist (1944), Almquist and Grau (1944), and Hegsted (1944). Acceptable food intake, however, was a problem in all these studies. In 1950, H. M. Scott and co-workers at the University of Illinois began a meticulous search for a pattern of amino acids that would permit near-optimum growth. The first reference standard was reported by Glista et al. (1951). However the chicks had to be force-fed to obtain even slow rates of growth.

Keywords

Serine Histidine Leucine Creatine Phenylalanine 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • David H. Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Animal ScienceUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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