Gas-Liquid Equilibria of the CO2-CO and CO2-CH4-CO Systems

  • L. J. Christiansen
  • A. Fredenslund
  • N. Gardner
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 19)

Abstract

In densely populated areas which are far from natural gas and oil fields but within easy access to coal deposits, coal gasification may soon become the basis of an economically feasible, alternate energy supply. The refined gasification reaction products may be distributed through the existing city gas networks. A high-pressure, low-temperature gas-liquid contacting process may be employed in refining the gasification products, the major components of which are hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen. In order to predict the gas- liquid equilibrium properties of mixtures of these components, it is necessary to study all the possible binary mixtures. Data on ternary mixtures of these components also give some insight to the behavior of the multicomponent mixture. Mixtures containing hydrogen are not covered in this work, and of the remaining possible binary systems, accurate and complete gas-liquid equilibrium data do exist for the CO2-CH4 [1,2], H2S-CO2 [3,4], H2S-CH4 [5,6], and CH4-CO systems Gas—liquid equilibrium data for the CO2-CO systems are more scarce, however. Kaminishi et al [9] have published a total of eighteen complete p-T-x-y measurements spread over five different isotherms (—50, —40, —20,0, and + 10°C). The dilute and critical regions received virtually no attention in that study [9], making a thermodynamic analysis of the data difficult. The H2S-CO system has, as far as is known, not been studied at all. For practical reasons, both with regards to the gasification process and the experimental procedure, the CO2-CO binary system was chosen for further study in this work, which also includes gas-liquid equilibrium data for the CO2-CH4-CO system.

Keywords

Methane Dioxide Sulfide Platinum Carbon Monoxide 

Notation

a

= constant in Redlich-Kwong equation of state

b

= constant in Redlich-Kwong equation of state

ƒ

= fugacity, atm

H

= Henry’s law constant, atm

K

= equilibrium ratio

P

= pressure, atm

R

= gas constant, cm3-atm/mole-K

T

= temperature, K

υ

= molar volume, cm3/mole

x

= liquid-phase mole fraction

y

= gas-phase mole fraction

z

= compressibility factor

Greek Letters

α

= self-interaction constant

γ

= activity coefficient

η

= dilation constant

ϰ

= deviation from geometric mean

φ

= fugacity coefficient

Φ

= volume fraction

ω

= acentric factor

Ω

= constant in Redlich-Kwong equation of state

Subscripts

1

= carbon dioxide

2

= methane

3

= carbon monoxide

i,j,k

= components

(1)

= in solvent, component 1

α, η

= subscripts for van Laar constants

c

= critical property for mixture

Superscripts

*

= asymmetric convention is used

= infinite-dilution property

L

= liquid-phase property

G

= gas-phase property

-

= partial molar Property

(P)

= evaluated at pressure P

Psat

= saturation pressure of component 1

sat

= evaluated at saturation

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. J. Christiansen
    • 1
  • A. Fredenslund
    • 1
  • N. Gardner
    • 2
  1. 1.Instituttet for KemiteknikTechnical University of DenmarkLyngbyDenmark
  2. 2.Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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