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European Progress in Cryopower Transmission

  • G. Bogner
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 19)

Abstract

European research and development activities in cryopower transmission were initiated more than ten years ago. In fact, as early as 1963 the English BICC (British Insulated Callenders Cables Ltd.) decided to design and build a laboratory-scale superconducting link in order to test the feasibility of superconducting ac transmission. This link was designed for a high-current, low-voltage transmission. Its length was about 3 m and it consisted basically of a single-phase conductor system in the form of a coaxial pair of tubular niobium conductors. By the end of 1967, the work had achieved a superconducting ac transmission of 2080 A[1]. Results of another early study on cryogenic cables were presented by Klaudy [2] of Graz, Austria at the 1965 Cryogenic Engineering Conference.

Keywords

Electrical Insulation Dielectric Strength Flexible Cable Corrugate Tube Cable Insulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bogner
    • 1
  1. 1.Siemens, AktiengesellschaftErlangenGermany

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