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Minimal Brain Dysfunction in Perspective

Chapter

Abstract

Although the term minimal brain dysfunction (MBD) recently has been supplanted by alternative nomenclature (DSM III, Spitzer, 1980), it continues to be applied in substance, if not in name. In part, this may reflect its relevance to a variety of problems (Birch, 1964; Denckla, 1977b; Touwen, 1978; Yule, 1978). Included within the rubric of MBD is a wide array of childhood disabilities, such as the failure to develop age-appropriate academic skills; attention deficits and hyperactivity; perceptual-motor, language, memory and cognitive deficiencies; difficulties in social adjustment; and, neurologic signs of EEG abnormalities (Conners, 1967; Clements, 1966; Gross & Wilson, 1974; Ochroch, 1981; Touwen & Prechtl, 1970; Wender, 1971). The incidence of these disorders varies markedly with estimates ranging as high as 50% for children seen at mental health centers, and between 5% to 20% for children in the school population (Becker, 1974; Minskoff, 1973; Schmitt, 1975; Wender, 1971).

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Brain Damage Brain Dysfunction Child Neurology Hyperactive Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Children’s Hospital of PittsburghUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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