Pediatric Psychology

An Appraisal
  • Edward R. Christophersen
  • Michael A. Rapoff
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (volume 3)

Abstract

The pediatric psychologist is any psychologist who works with children in a medical/pediatric setting, dealing with nonpsychiatric clinical entities. Tuma (1975) describes pediatric psychology as an offshoot of clinical child psychology. According to Tuma, the pediatric psychologist has a major commitment to the development of methods, philosophy, and training guidelines for the practice of clinical child psychology in relation to the practice of pediatrics. Since the pediatric psychologist operates within a pediatric setting, his treatment procedures are not geared to long-term involvement with the patient. Whether the patient is seen in the pediatric office, as an inpatient for consultation, or as an inpatient for actual treatment, the pediatric psychologist operates within a limited time framework, compared with the clinical child psychologist, who sees patients in his office over an often extensive period of time.

Keywords

Penicillin Resi Constipation Imipramine 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward R. Christophersen
    • 1
  • Michael A. Rapoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA

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