Learning Disability and Hyperactivity (with Comments on Minimal Brain Dysfunction)

  • James M. Kauffman
  • Daniel P. Hallahan
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 2)

Abstract

Practitioners in the child-care professions—especially clinical psychologists, pediatricians, psychiatrists, and educators—are very frequently called upon to deal with children who have serious academic difficulty in school and/or behave in ways that exasperate adults. The recognition, clinical description, and treatment of such children are not recent developments. On the contrary, clear descriptions of such children and a variety of treatment methods can be found in the 19th-century literature on idiocy (mental retardation), insanity (behavior disorders), and child care (Hallahan & Kauffman, 1977; Kauffman, 1976, 1977). However, in recent decades new labels have been suggested for the problems some of these children present: minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), hyperactivity (HA), and learning disability (LD). In brief, the labels are used to refer to children who are thought to have intelligence above the retarded range but who are suspected of having brains that do not function properly (MBD), show high rates of socially inappropriate behavior (HA), and achieve academically at a level far below what one would predict on the basis of their IQs (LD).

Keywords

Placebo Obesity Depression Caffeine Hydrochloride 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Kauffman
    • 1
  • Daniel P. Hallahan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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