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Strategy for Studying Health Effects of Pesticides / Fertilizer Mixtures in Groundwater

  • Raymond S. H. Yang
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 127)

Abstract

From the perspective of environmental exposure to chemicals, there is probably no such thing as “single chemical exposures.” For instance, in an accidental spillage of a single chemical in transit (e.g., railroad tankers or trucks), the emergency response crew (e.g., fire fighters, police officers) may have been exposed to a single chemical in high concentration. However, this must be considered in the context of “background chemical (natural or synthetic) exposures” from foods, drinks, cosmetics or personal hygiene products, and indoor and outdoor pollutants. In that sense, the single chemical exposure is merely an excursion of higher-concentration exposure to a given chemical at certain time above all the other sources of chemical exposures.

Keywords

Groundwater Contamination Chemical Mixture Ground Water Quality National Toxicology Program Groundwater Contaminant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond S. H. Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental HealthColorado State UniversityFt. CollinsUSA

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