Advertisement

Replication of a Clinical Outcome Study on a Hospital-Based Stress Management and Behavioral Medicine Program Utilizing Flotation REST and Biofeedback

  • Gilbert M. Koula
  • John C. Kemp
  • Keith M. Keane
  • Allan D. Belden
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Psychosocial stress is accepted as a known contributor to emotional and somatic illness. This study is a replication of pre-post clinical effectiveness of a medically supervised treatment program for stress disorders. The program is hospital-based and employs biofeedback as an introductory self-regulation, stress reduction method and flotation REST as a primary self-regulation, stress reduction method.

Eighty respondents of 154 out-patients are reviewed statistically assessing change in symptom severity and frequency and secondary symptoms.

The results are reviewed with comparison to an initial clinical outcome study on a similar out-patient group treated in the same program. The results continue to be strongly suggestive of health benefits with the use of this treatment model.

Keywords

Migraine Headache Tension Headache Secondary Symptom Systemic Arterial Blood Pressure Major Diagnostic Category 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Basowitz, H., Persky, H., Horchin, S.J. & Grinker, R.R. Anxiety and Stress. New York, Toronto, London: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1954.Google Scholar
  2. Budzynski, T.H., Stoyva, J.M. & Adler, C. Feedback-induced muscle relaxation: Application to tension headache. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 1970, 1205–1211.Google Scholar
  3. Friedman, M. & Rosenman, R.H. Type A Behavior and Your Heart. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1974.Google Scholar
  4. Gatchel, R.J. EMB, biofeedback, and anxiety reduction. In: White, L. & Tursky, B. (Eds.) Clinical Biofeedback: Efficacy of Mechanisms. New York, NY: Guilford Press, 1982.Google Scholar
  5. Guttman, M.C. & Benson, H. Interaction of environmental factors in systemic arterial blood pressure: A review. Medicine, 1971, 50, 543–553.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Jacobs, G.D., Heilbronner, R.L. & Stanley, J.M. The effects of short term flotation REST on relaxation: A controlled study. In: Fine, T.H & Turner, J.W., Jr. (Eds). First International Conference on REST and Self-Regulation. Toledo, OH: Medical College of Ohio, 1985, 86–102.Google Scholar
  7. Patel, C.H. Yoga and biofeedback in the management of hypertension. Lancet, 1973, ii, 1053–1055.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Pelletier, K.R. Mind as Healer/Mind as Slaver. New York, NY: Dell Publishing Company, 1977.Google Scholar
  9. Selye, H. The Stress of Life. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 1956.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilbert M. Koula
  • John C. Kemp
  • Keith M. Keane
  • Allan D. Belden

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations