Pedophilia pp 544-551 | Cite as

The Complexity of the Concept of Behavioral Development: A Summary

  • Gail Zivin

Abstract

The behavior and feeling patterns that this volume examines appear to be inordinately complex, difficult-to-predict results of developmental processes. While many sets of contributing variables are suggested in the chapters of this volume, none of the authors would claim to present an overall picture of how sexual/affectional development typically proceeds or goes awry. But even if one had indisputable evidence for the contribution of one or all of these suggested factors, the choice would still be open on the general model of development into which these factors fit.

Keywords

Amid Posit Pedophilia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gail Zivin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorJefferson Medical CollegePhiladelphiaUSA

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