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Women In Federal Government Employment

  • Nijole V. Benokraitis
  • Melissa Kesler Gilbert
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

The federal government is the nation’s largest employer, with nearly 3 million civilian employees. Almost 81 percent of these workers are in white-collar jobs; of these, women accounted for 47.6 percent of the federal white-collar workers in 1986. Over one and a half million women work for the federal government in white-collar jobs. The question arises: How well does the government, as a major employer, meet its affirmative action obligations?

Keywords

Affirmative Action Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Federal Employment Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nijole V. Benokraitis
  • Melissa Kesler Gilbert

There are no affiliations available

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