Effective Affirmative Action Programs

  • Fletcher A. Blanchard
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Over the last three centuries members of the major U.S. minority groups – Blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and Native Americans – and women experienced both formal and informal barriers to their occupational and educational participation in American life. Over the last twenty-five years all Americans have experienced the elimination of many of the legal prohibitions which supported the exclusion of minorities and women from equal employment opportunity and equal protection under the law. Equal opportunity policies and civil rights legislation constitute the legal framework by which the <i>formal</i> barriers have been dismantled.

Keywords

Transportation Stratification Arena 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

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  • Fletcher A. Blanchard

There are no affiliations available

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