Private and Public Experiences and the Self

  • James T. Tedeschi
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

A concern about the relationship of private and public events has been a central one for social psychology. One of the earliest experiments in social psychology affirmed that the performance of children was different when an audience was present than when they were alone (Triplett, 1897). The entire problem of social conformity revolves around an assumed discrepancy between what people “really” believe or want to do and what they say they believe or what they actually do when they experience pressure from others to make judgments, express attitudes, or engage in behaviors that are opposed to such private preferences. Indeed, a distinction between what is said and done in public and what is inside the individual’s mind (and hence private) has been central to the interpretation of many other phenomena in social psychology, including social facilitation, group polarization effects, social conformity, anticipatory attitude change, attitude change in the forced compliance situation, psychological reactance, and trangression-compliance.

Keywords

Europe Income Beach Hull Tated 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

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  • James T. Tedeschi

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