Children’s Use of Cognitive Strategies, How to Teach Strategies, and What to Do If They Can’t Be Taught

  • Michael Pressley
  • D. L. Forrest-Pressley
  • Darlene Elliott-Faust
  • Gloria Miller
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

This chapter is about children’s use of strategies. Although the emphasis is on memory, the discussion includes strategies applied in a number of domains. Almost 20 years have passed since Flavell’s seminal studies of children’s strategies (e.g., Keeney, Cannizzo, & Flavell, 1967), and an enormous amount of research has been reported since then. The present chapter does not survey that work exhaustively, but summarizes current thinking about strategic functioning in children. In doing so, we present a revised definition of strategy, discuss a model of strategy functioning that is more precise than some of its historical predecessors, review recent research relevant to that model, compare two differing tactics to strategy instruction and strategy instructional research, as well as consider alternatives to strategy instruction for children who cannot execute cognitive strategies.

Keywords

Clay Assure Stein Editing Clarification 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Pressley
  • D. L. Forrest-Pressley
  • Darlene Elliott-Faust
  • Gloria Miller

There are no affiliations available

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