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Short-Term Memory Development in Childhood and Adolescence

  • Frank N. Dempster
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

This chapter is organized into three main sections. The first focuses on current theoretical issues and controversies concerning short-term memory. Here, among other topics, I include an introduction to leading theoretical models of short-term memory and a discussion of the relationship between traditional measures of short-term memory and more complex measures of intellectual ability. Also, I outline a framework for viewing short-term memory entirely in mechanistic or structural terms (see Chapter 3 by Bjorklund for some analogous perspectives on organizational factors in memory). Although some of these topics have little to do with developmental issues per se, they are concerned with matters that I believe have important implications for the study of short-term memory development. The second main section focuses on possible sources of short-term memory development, while the third contains a summary, along with some concluding remarks.

Keywords

Retention Interval Digit Span Term Memory Proactive Interference Span Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank N. Dempster

There are no affiliations available

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