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Discourse Development in Atypical Language Learners

  • Sandy Friel-Patti
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

During the last two decades, the study of language development in children has experienced a broadening of perspective from an emphasis on form to a concern with function. There has also been a move from the analysis of the speaker to the analysis of the communicative dyad. This change in focus has brought about new methodologies, issues, and problems that are the current concern of both psychologists and linguists alike.

Keywords

Nonverbal Behavior Language Impairment Impaired Child Language Disorder Hearing Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandy Friel-Patti
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden

There are no affiliations available

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