Verbal Processing in Poor and Normal Readers

  • Frank R. Vellutino
  • Donna M. Scanlon
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

Of the many cognitive skills possessed by the literate adult, the ability to read is certainly one of the most complex and diifficult to acquire. The individual who accurately and efficiently translates a string of printed words into a meaningful communication appears to be accomplishing the task with little mental effort; but this impression belies the interactive processes and the multiform subskills involved in effecting successful translation, as well as the enormous amount of coded information that must be acquired in order to do so. Thus, in addition to average or above average intelligence, the fluent reader can be assumed to have well-developed language skills, intact visual and auditory memory, normal ability to associate and integrate intra-and intermodal stimuli, and normal ability to abstract and generalize patterned or rule-generated information. He/she can also be credited with an extensive and highly elaborated knowledge of the meanings of most words he/she has encountered in print, along with an intimate acquaintance with the grammatical contexts in which they are appropriately utilized. At the same time, he/she has become conversant with the structural redundancies embedded in spoken and written English (which implies a firm knowledge of spelling-sound invariants) and can employ them for identification of new words and efficient discrimination among familiar words.

Keywords

Clay Covariance Expense Hunt Tate 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank R. Vellutino
  • Donna M. Scanlon

There are no affiliations available

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