Toxoplasmosis

  • Juan Orellana
  • Alan H. Friedman

Abstract

Serological evidence that children have toxoplasmosis may be present without evidence of clinical disease. Toxoplasmosis is caused by toxoplasma gondii which is an obligate intracellular parasite. The fetuses acquire the disease from the mother who becomes infected while pregnant. The classic signs of congenital toxoplasmosis include fever, jaundice, chorioretinitis, intracranial calcifications on radiographic studies, hydrocephalus, and convulsions. Infants may be born with the disease, or it may not become apparent until the infant is almost 1 year old. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) fluorescent antibody test is diagnostic for the disease.

Keywords

Retina Prednisone Hydrocephalus Xenon Clindamycin 

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Selected Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Orellana
    • 1
  • Alan H. Friedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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