Toward a Gradiometer Analytic Model

  • Dave Sonnabend
Conference paper
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 110)

Abstract

The first solid attempt to model the data type, formulate the filter structure, and perform covariance, for an orbiting gravity gradiometer may be found in [1]. To make early progress, many sweeping assumptions were made, and quite a bit was swept under the rug, although identified as such in the paper. In particular, a great deal of work was avoided by oversimplifying the dynamics. In this memo, I’ll introduce a much more elaborate and realistic model. The main new features are a general interia tensor for the floated instrument, air drag and radiation pressure models using cubic power spectra, and more reasonable kinematics. The theory for all this is developed below.

Keywords

Torque Covariance 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    D Sonnabend & W. M McEneaney, “Gravity Gradient Estimation”, Presented at the Bierman Memorial Symposium, in Proc. IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Austin TX, 12–88.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    WM McEneaney, “Gravity Gradiometer Filter Software Documentation”, JPL IOM 314.4–689, 2–20–89.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    D Sonnabend, “Terminal Covariance”, JPL EM 314–481, 6–11–90.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    D Sonnabend, “APRICOT: Instant Interactive Covariance”, JPL EM 314–493, 11–13–90.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    “U. S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976”; NOAA, NASA, USAF.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    D Sonnabend, “Time Averaged Noise”, JPL EM 314–494, 12–12–90.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    D Sonnabend, “Cubic Power Spectra”, JPL EM 314–507, 6–18–91.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dave Sonnabend
    • 1
  1. 1.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institude of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

Personalised recommendations