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Investigational and Research Lasers

  • David H. Sliney
  • Stephen L. Trokel

Abstract

Special safety problems can occur with experimental lasers used in the medical research laboratory or during clinical studies. These instruments often resemble laboratory or industrial lasers and are usually not in full compliance with the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (FDA/CDRH) regulations for medical lasers. Moreover, they are often used by researchers who have an intimate familiarity with this type of equipment and clinicians who are less familiar with prototype equipment and devices. Nonetheless, the safety requirements for use for this laser is in no way lessened by the fact that it is used in the research environment. Indeed, the users must hold to an even higher standard of safety because engineering safety controls are usually less, and the unknowns of the investigative environment introduce special hazards.

Keywords

Medical Device Medical Laser American National Standard Institute Laser Product Laser Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • David H. Sliney
    • 1
  • Stephen L. Trokel
    • 2
  1. 1.FallstonUSA
  2. 2.Harkness Eye InstituteColumbia—Presbyterian Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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