Vaccination against Animal Retroviruses

  • Daniel Portetelle
  • Isabelle Callebaut
  • Françoise Bex
  • Arsène Burny
Part of the Progress in Vaccinology book series (VACCINOLOGY, volume 4)

Abstract

Retroviruses were among the earliest known viruses, discovered by Ellerman and Bang in 1908 and by P. Rous in 1910 as filterable agents causing leukemias or sarcomas in chickens, respectively. For many years, however, they had a small following in the scientific community, due in part to the lack of reliable cell culture systems and appropriate biochemical techniques to characterize these transmissible agents. These attitudes began to shift by the late 1960s with the discoveries of viruses, later proved to be retroviruses, that cause a variety of naturally occurring disorders in several animal species. They can be characterized as (a) diseases with uncontrolled growth of cells of various types and origins, (b) disease with the loss of certain cell types, and (c) disorders in which signs and symptoms of inflammation and autoimmunity prevail. Some of these viruses are capable of inducing several well-defined disease entities (see BLV, FeLV, and FeLV) (3). In the last decade the pace of progress in retrovirology has been further accelerated and amplified by the discovery of new connections between retroviruses and human diseases: (a) discovery of human retroviruses that cause adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and (b) identification of human oncogenes related to retroviral transforming genes.

Keywords

Formalin Foam Arsene Pneumonia Influenza 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Portetelle
  • Isabelle Callebaut
  • Françoise Bex
  • Arsène Burny

There are no affiliations available

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