Determining the Long-term Costs and Benefits of Alternative Farm Plans

  • A. Kubicki
  • C. Denby
  • M. Stevens
  • A. Haagensen
  • J. Chatfield
Conference paper

Abstract

The emphasis of this chapter is on the integration of physical, production, financial, and social issues into farm management plans. The process needs to include the comparison of long-term costs and benefits of the various alternatives available, and the determination of the economic viability of the farm.

Keywords

Clay Permeability Income Expense Gypsum 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kubicki
  • C. Denby
  • M. Stevens
  • A. Haagensen
  • J. Chatfield

There are no affiliations available

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