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Social Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities: Towards a Broader Perspective

  • Sharon Vaughn
  • Ruth McIntosh
  • Nina Zaragoza

Abstract

Children who are rejected by their peers are at risk for school dropout, crime, delinquency, and psychological adjustment problems later in life (for review see, Parker & Asher, 1987). This empirically based finding supported by longitudinal data emphasizes the importance of early peer relationships in the social competence and adjustment of children throughout their lifetime. Thus, the work of Bryan (e.g., Bryan, 1974a,b, 1976), who initially identified the low peer acceptance and poor social relationships of many children with learning disabilities, has provided a catalyst for researchers to further examine the social competence of children with learning disabilities.

Keywords

Social Skill Social Competence Learning Disability Learn Disability Social Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Vaughn
  • Ruth McIntosh
  • Nina Zaragoza

There are no affiliations available

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