Educational Assessment

  • Ennio Cipani
  • Robert Morrow
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Assessment has been defined broadly as the process of collecting information (Salvia & Ysseldyke, 1988). In the educational delivery system, assessment information can be used for three related, but somewhat different, purposes: (a) referral and screening, (b) diagnosis and placement, and (c) instructional planning and evaluation of student progress. This chapter examines assessment methods and procedures as regards the three purposes stated above. First, assessment from a referral and screening standpoint is discussed. Assessment from a diagnostic/placement concern follows. Once an individual is diagnosed as learning disabled and placed in the continuum of special education services, instructional and behavioral programming needs have to be determined. Assessment from this perspective, both in terms of instructional and behavioral deficits, is also addressed.

Keywords

Income Expense Tray Blindness Dick 

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ennio Cipani
  • Robert Morrow

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