Behavioral Approaches

  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Diane E. D. Deitz
  • Judy Singh
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Behavioral approaches to the remediation of academic deficits in students with learning disabilities involve the use of stimulus-control and reinforcement-based procedures to produce the desired gains in academic behavior. The specific techniques used are derived from a model that emphasizes environmental variables as controllers of behavior, and that eschews the use of intervening variables such as psychological processes as explanatory or heuristic tools (Skinner, 1950). Traditionally, subject variables have been accorded little importance, and the assessment of academic deficits is usually restricted to a functional analysis of those deficits in relation to their antecedents and consequences for the student’s behavior in the learning situation. Of course, the lack of emphasis in this model on the diagnosis of the disorder as to cause or classification means that little is known about the generalizability of the effects of behavioral approaches across diagnostic groups or subgroups. Indeed, students with learning disabilities appear to be a heterogeneous group with regard to their etiology, related behavior problems, and academic deficits. However, it remains to be demonstrated that diagnostic subgroups do require differential academic remediation.

Keywords

Hull Stein Prefix Haas Suffix 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Diane E. D. Deitz
  • Judy Singh

There are no affiliations available

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