Polypodiaceae Bercht. & J. S. Presl

Genera 107–137
  • Alice F. Tryon
  • Bernard Lugardon

Abstract

A widely distributed family that occurs throughout the world extending from the tropics to northern and southern latitudes. Thirty-one genera treated here have ellipsoidal, monolete spores with the exception of Loxogramma, which includes some species with trilete, globose spores. The blechnoid exospore usually forms the largest part of the sporoderm and is sometimes undulate, rugate, or verrucate, but is often plain. The perispore is usually thin, commonly beset with globules, and with a plain but sometimes tuberculate, verrucate, or granulate surface. In a few species of Pyrrosia and Polypodium the perispore forms an irregularly winged envelope. The myrmecophytic species in Solanopteris have prominently echinate spores and some in Lecanopteris have a unique, stranded perispore.

Keywords

Chlorophyll Peri Miocene Malaysia Argentina 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alice F. Tryon
    • 1
  • Bernard Lugardon
    • 2
  1. 1.Herbarium, Department of BiologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Biologie VégétaleUniversité Paul SabatierToulouseFrance

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