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Septic Abortion and Septic Thrombophlebitis

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Surgical Diseases in Pregnancy

Part of the book series: Clinical Perspectives in Obstetrics and Gynecology ((CPOG))

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Abstract

Despite the introduction of a multitude of broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial agents, infection is a major cause of morbidity and an all too often factor in mortality among obstetric and gynecologic patients Whereas genital tract infection remains one of the most common clinical problems in obstetrics and gynecology, bacteremia is fairly uncommon.1–6 This finding is in contradistinction to medical and surgical services, where gram-negative bacteremia continues to be a common and potentially life-threatening problem. It is estimated that between 71,000 and 330,000 cases of nosocomial gram-negative bacteremias occur in the United States each year, and that more than 30% of these cases are fatal. Of special note is the recognition that the prognosis for bacteremic patients is correlated with the development of shock.

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Sweet, R.L. (1990). Septic Abortion and Septic Thrombophlebitis. In: Cibils, L.A. (eds) Surgical Diseases in Pregnancy. Clinical Perspectives in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-8979-8_3

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