The Occurrence and Significance of Bound Pesticide Residues in Soil

  • Alan Calderbank
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 108)

Abstract

It has been known for more than 20 years that when some pesticides,1 or their degradation products, enter soil they become bound to the organic matter or clay mineral fraction of the soil (Bailey and White 1964). In this bound state they are very difficult to extract and characterize, and tend to lose their biological activity. Because of the difficulty in extraction and identification it was generally only possible to demonstrate the presence of these soil bound residues with the use of radiolabeled pesticides. Many of those pesticides formerly believed to be readily degraded and “lost” from soil, were later shown to form these bound residues, formerly undetected, and it became apparent that the concept of persistent and non-persistent residues needed reconsideration (Katan et al. 1976).

Keywords

Clay Kaolinite Triazine Carbaryl Cypermethrin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Calderbank
    • 1
  1. 1.Consultancy in ToxicologyEnvironmental and Regulatory Affairs (CITERA)Ascot, BerkshireEngland

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