Man Is the Measure of All Things

  • Miriam Cherkes-Julkowski
  • Nancy Gertner
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Our ability to observe spontaneous strategy usage or to instill effective strategies depends on how well we can observe them in their users. In this chapter we will focus on some of the methods that have been used to examine strategy use on a number of problem-solving and memory tasks in handicapped and non-handicapped populations. Some of these measurement techniques have been developed to tap well-known and successful learning strategies, both verbal and nonverbal, such as rehearsal and categorization. The most widely researched strategies have tended to be those that can be most satisfactorily measured. Nevertheless, numerous ingenious systems have been devised to overcome some of the measurement problems involved in accessing more elusive strategic behavior. We will describe some of these studies in detail and attempt to evaluate the degree of success with which they have achieved their goal. This brief survey does not presume to be a comprehensive review of all possible types of strategic behavior or measurement techniques. Our aim is to offer a sampling of various measurement possibilities, verbal and nonverbal, direct and indirect, covering a range of behaviors including memory, problem-solving, and academic skills.

Keywords

Resis Nylon Stein Sorting Tempo 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miriam Cherkes-Julkowski
    • 1
  • Nancy Gertner
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Education, Department of Educational PsychologyThe University of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Gesell InstituteNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Guilford Public SchoolsGuilfordUSA

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