Advertisement

The AO / ASIF Principles:Fracture (Cast) Disease

  • Alan E. Freeland
  • Michael E. Jabaley
  • James L. Hughes

Abstract

Restoration of anatomic relations correlates highly with functional outcome in the hand. The priorities in treatment are a stable, well-maintained reduction and early motion. Prolonged immobilization, especially in a nonfunctional cast, can lead to a vicious cycle of pain, swelling, and unresolved edema. Edema fluid is a proteinaceous exudate that will congeal into scar tissue around joints and tendons and cause joint stiffness, contracture, and tendon adhesions. Muscle atrophy, brawny skin /induration, and osteoporosis follow. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy may sometimes occur and further complicate the picture. This constellation of symptoms and physical changes has been called “fracture disease.” Like proud flesh and suppuration in soft tissue healing, it is not a necessary part of fracture repair and can be avoided. Prevention is the best treatment. All fracture treatment, whatever the method, must be geared to achieve stability and function to prevent these complications.

Keywords

Internal Fixation Soft Tissue Injury Early Motion Anatomic Reduction Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan E. Freeland
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael E. Jabaley
    • 3
    • 4
  • James L. Hughes
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Section of Hand SurgeryUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA
  2. 2.Jackson Veteran’s Administration Hospital, Mississippi Methodist Rehabilitation Center, Blake Clinic for Crippled Children and Mississippi Children’s Rehabilitation CenterJacksonUSA
  3. 3.Division of Plastic SurgeryUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA
  4. 4.St. Dominic’s-Jackson Health Services Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, River Oaks Hospital, Mississippi Methodist Rehabilitation CenterJacksonUSA
  5. 5.Division of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA
  6. 6.Jackson Veteran’s Administration Hospital, Mississippi Methodist Rehabilitation Center, Blake Clinic for Crippled Children and Mississippi Children’s Rehabilitation CenterJacksonUSA

Personalised recommendations