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Tumors

  • Douglas J. Pritchard

Abstract

The region of the hip may be defined as that area which contains the proximal femur, the acetabulum, the adjacent innominate bone, and all of the surrounding soft tissues. A wide variety of benign and malignant bone and soft-tissue tumors occur in this region, including almost all of the primary bone tumors, many soft-tissue tumors, and many metastatic lesions.

Keywords

Synovial Sarcoma Giant Cell Tumor Osteoid Osteoma Granular Cell Tumor Myositis Ossificans 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

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  • Douglas J. Pritchard

There are no affiliations available

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