Mathematical modeling in diffractive optics

  • Avner Friedman
Part of the The IMA Volumes in Mathematics and its Applications book series (IMA, volume 67)

Abstract

Diffractive optics is an emerging technology with many practical applications. Some of the applications and the need for mathematical modeling underlying them were discussed in two previous presentations by Allen Cox (from Honeywell Technology Center) as reported in [1; Chap. 22] and [2; Chap. 5]. One of the most elementary applications is replacing conventional lens by diffractive gratings which are produced by interference fringes on holographic plates. Other applications include nonreflective interface (called moth-eye grating), beam splitters, sensors, and variety of corrective lenses.

Keywords

Helmholtz Equation Direct Problem Diffractive Optic Nonlinear Optical Material Fredholm Alternative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Avner Friedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Mathematics and its ApplicationsUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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