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The Effects of Fire on Physical and Chemical Properties of Soils in Mediterranean-Climate Shrublands

  • Norman L. Christensen
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 107)

Abstract

Given the rapid oxidation of above-ground biomass and the differences in prefire and postfire microclimate, it is not surprising that the biogeochemical consequences of fire have received considerable attention. Fire influences virtually every process illustrated in Figure 5-1; however, few generalizations about its specific effects on soils and biogeochemical process are possible. The variation in such effects is conditioned by at least four broad classes of factors: (1) variation in basic site features such as slope aspect, climate, and soil; (2) spatial and temporal variation in fire regimes; (3) prefire status of vegetation in fuels; (4) postfire patterns of ecosystem recovery. The role of these factors in determining the patterns of fire effects on soils and biogeochemical processes is a central theme of this chapter.

Keywords

Debris Flow Fire Regime Slope Aspect Fire Behavior Fuel Moisture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1994

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  • Norman L. Christensen

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