Methodological Issues in Longitudinal Research on Learning Disabilities

  • James D. McKinney

Abstract

The purposes of this chapter are to discuss (a) the definition of longitudinal research and the types of research questions addressed by longitudinal designs, and (b) the practical and methodological issues involved in designing and conducting longitudinal studies and in performing longitudinal data analyses. In addition, the limitations of longitudinal research will be discussed. Therefore, this chapter does not review that research on learning disabilities that has used longitudinal designs, but rather illustrates the purpose and methods of longitudinal research with selected studies of individuals with learning disabilities and presents both the strengths and limitations of a longitudinal approach.

Keywords

Migration Covariance Transportation Assure Expense 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1994

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  • James D. McKinney

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