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Classical Theoretical Approaches to Computational Aeroacoustics

  • William E. Zorumski
Conference paper
Part of the ICASE/NASA LaRC Series book series (ICASE/NASA)

Abstract

An assessment is given of the relation of classical theoretical approaches to the newly defined field of computational aeroacoustics. It is indicated that classical methods play two important roles. First, the classical methods supply desirable formulations of the governing equations which are suitable for computational implementation. Second, the classical methods provide boundary conditions which are essential for accurate numerical simulations within a finite computational domain.

Keywords

Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Domain Acoustic Analogy Exact Boundary Condition Acoustic Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Zorumski
    • 1
  1. 1.NASA Langley Research CenterHamptonUSA

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