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The Challenge of Reinventing Police and Community

  • Michael E. Buerger

Abstract

The landscape of modern policing is littered with innovative programs that enjoyed a brief moment in the sun, generated a few self-congratulatory articles in the police practitioner magazines, then quickly and quietly disappeared in response to budgetary pressures or managerial changes.1 The inherent problem of police innovation is that it almost always is an initiative that originates with “management cop culture” and is imposed on the “street cop culture” (Reuss-Ianni, 1983). As a result, police innovation generally suffers from special-unit ghettoization and strong resistance from rank-and-file officers, which either eviscerates the program or makes its expansion impossible. Police initiatives that purport to alter the basic police-citizen relationship encounter further difficulties in identifying “the community” and in empowering community participation in policing.

Keywords

Police Officer Crime Prevention Police Department Community Police Police Establishment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Buerger

There are no affiliations available

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