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Control Motivation and Self-Appraisal

Chapter

Abstract

Few constructs in psychology have generated as much research attention as the control construct. It has played a central role in numerous conceptual formulations including accounts of social perception (e.g., Heider, 1958; Jones & Davis, 1965; Kelley, 1967), self-perception (e.g., Langer, 1983), personality (e.g., Burger, this volume; deCharms, 1968; Rotter, 1966), motivation (e.g., Brehm, 1966; Carver & Scheier, 1981; White, 1959), environmental impact (e.g., Glass & Singer, 1972; Schmidt & Keating, 1979), and health (e.g., Glass, 1977; Seligman, 1975; Wallston, Wallston, & DeVillis, 1978). Its appeal stems from the intuitively attractive notion that humans desire control and from the belief that control motivation has pervasive perceptual, cognitive, affective, and behavioral consequences. The empirical evidence to date has generally supported these beliefs.

Keywords

Social Psychology Control Motivation Behavior Pattern Social Comparison Experimental Social Psychology 
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