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Individual Differences in Control Motivation and Social Information Processing

Chapter

Abstract

For more than 20 years now, personal control has been among the most ubiquitous concepts employed by personality and social psychologists. How much control people believe they have over an event can set in motion a large number of either positive or negative consequences (cf. Burger, 1989; Lefcourt, 1982; Thompson, Cheek, & Graham, 1988). Personal control has been a central concept in theory and research on learned helplessness, Type A behavior, intrinsic motivation, and locus of control. How much control we believe we have over a situation has been used to explain depression, achievement striving, gambling, crowding, health behavior, attributional processing, and aggression.

Keywords

Gambling Behavior Personal Control Experimental Social Psychology Social Psychology Bulletin Neutral Item 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

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