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Uncertainty, Mental Models, and Learned Helplessness: An Anatomy of Control Loss

Chapter

Abstract

It is well established that, after prolonged exposure to an uncontrollable situation, symptoms of learned helplessness (LH) emerge in humans as well as in infrahuman species: Performance of new tasks is seriously impaired and signs of emotional distress appear. Despite decades of intensive research, the causal mechanism underlying this fairly general behavioral phenomenon remains obscure.

Keywords

Mental Model Test Anxiety Informational Model Personal Future Life Task 
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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

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