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Perceptions of Control: Determinants and Mechanisms

Chapter

Abstract

Interest in individuals’ perceived control over their environment, and the physical and psychological effects of varying degrees of perceived personal control, has a long history in psychology. Control has been associated with a striving for superiority (Adler, 1930), an instinct to survive (Hendrick, 1943), a need for competence (White, 1959) and a desire for personal causation (deCharms, 1968). Even a cursory examination of the literature on control suggests that individuals are motivated to effect their environment in instrumental ways (Fisher, 1981).

Keywords

Personal Control Impression Management Depressed Subject Contingency Judgment Control Perception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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